Friday, June 13, 2008

New Materials Added June 5 - 12, 2008

TitleAuthorLocation
A whole new mind : why right-brainers will rule the future by Daniel H. Pink 153.3 PINK
Last child in the woods : saving our children from nature-deficit disorder by Richard Louv 155.4 LOUV
Sway : the irresistible pull of irrational behavior by Ori Brafman 155.9 BRAFMAN
Fooling some of the people all of the time : a long short story by David Einhorn 332.6 EINHORN
Gorgeously green : 8 simple steps to an earth-friendly life by Sophie Uliano 333.72082 ULIANO
The south beach diet supercharged : faster weight loss and better health for life by Arthur Agatston 613.2 AGATSTON
The jungle effect : a doctor discovers the healthiest diets from around the world--why they work and how to bring them home by Daphne Miller 613.2 MILLER
Change your brain, change your life : the breakthrough program for conquering anxiety, depression, obsessiveness, anger, and impulsiveness by Daniel G. Amen 616.89 AMEN
Hungry Girl : recipes and survival strategies for guilt-free eating in the real world by Lisa Lillien 641.5 LILLIEN
Yum-O! : the family cookbook by Rachael Ray 641.5 RAY
The 4-hour workweek : escape 9-5, live anywhere, and join the new rich by Timothy Ferriss 650.1 FERRISS
The one minute entrepreneur : the secret to creating and sustaining a successful business by Kenneth H. Blanchard 658.1 BLANCHAR
Yes! : 50 scientifically proven ways to be persuasive by Noah J. Goldstein 658.4 GOLDSTEIN
Junk beautiful : room by room makeovers with junkmarket style by Sue Whitney 747 WHITNEY
Living on the black : two pitchers, two teams, one season to remember by John Feinstein 796.357092 FEINSTEIN
When you are engulfed in flames by David Sedaris 814 SEDARIS
Unpuzzling your past : the best-selling basic guide to genealogy by Emily Anne Croom 929 CROOM
America's hidden history : untold tales of the first pilgrims, fighting women, and forgotten founders who shaped a nation by Kenneth C. Davis 973 DAVIS
The great derangement : a terrifying true story of war, politics, and religion at the twilight of the American empire by Matt Taibbi 973.93 TAIBBI
Bury my heart at Wounded Knee : an Indian history of the American West by Dee Alexander Brown 978 BROWN
The prince of Frogtown by Rick Bragg BIO BRAGG BRAGG
The Lincolns : portrait of a marriage by Daniel Mark Epstein BIO LINCOLN EPSTEIN
The house of Mondavi : the rise and fall of an American wine dynasty by Julia Flynn Siler BIO MONDAVI SILER
The woman who can't forget : the extraordinary story of living with the most remarkable memory known to science : a memoir by Jill Price BIO PRICE PRICE
Franklin and Lucy : President Roosevelt, Mrs. Rutherford, and the other remarkable women in his life by Joseph E. Persico BIO ROOSEVEL PERSICO
Counselor : a life at the edge of history by Theodore C. Sorensen BIO SORENSEN SORENSEN
Jawbreaker [sound recording] : the attack on Bin Laden and Al Qaeda : a personal account by the CIA's key field commander by Gary Berntsen CD 327.1273 BERNTSEN
Boogers are my beat [sound recording] : more lies, but some actual journalism by Dave Barry CD 814 BARRY
Uncle John's bathroom reader (the audio) [sound recording]. CD 818 UNCLE JOHN
Flags of our fathers [sound recording] by James Bradley CD 940.54 BRADLEY
Mass in C Minor, K.427 : Great Mass [sound recording] by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart CD MUSIC CLASSICAL MOZART
No frills [sound recording] by Paul Smith CD MUSIC SMITH
Earth's changing climate [DVD] DVD 363.7387 EARTHS CHANGING CLIMATE
The Romanov bride by Robert Alexander FIC ALEXANDE
All we ever wanted was everything : a novel by Janelle Brown FIC BROWN
Nothing to lose by Lee Child FIC CHILD
The Reapers by John Connolly FIC CONNOLLY
Plague ship : a novel of the Oregon files by Clive Cussler FIC CUSSLER
The garden of last days : a novel by Andre Dubus FIC DUBUS
Death and honor by W. E. B. Griffin FIC GRIFFIN
Shadow of power : a Paul Madriani novel by Steve Martini FIC MARTINI
Fearless /Diana Palmer. by Diana Palmer FIC PALMER
The Pakistani bride by Bapsi Sidhwa FIC SIDHWA
Moon Shell Beach : a novel by Nancy Thayer FIC THAYER
Lover enshrined by J. R. Ward FIC WARD
Irish immigrants in America : an interactive history adventure by Elizabeth Raum JUV 304.8 RAUM
Democracy by Liam O'Donnell JUV 321.8 O'DONNELL
Citizenship by Jason Skog JUV 323.60973 SKOG
Political parties by Michael Burgan JUV 324.273 BURGAN
Political elections by Davis Miller JUV 324.973 MILLER
The CIA : stopping terrorists by Connie Colwell Miller JUV 327.1273 MILLER
The U.S. Congress by Eric Fein JUV 328.73 FEIN
SWAT teams : armed and ready by Connie Colwell Miller JUV 363.232 MILLER
The Federal Bureau of Investigation : hunting criminals by Connie Colwell Miller JUV 363.250973 MILLER
Crime scene investigators : uncovering the truth by Connie Colwell Miller JUV 363.252 MILLER
Snowboard superpipe by Connie Colwell Miller JUV 796.939 MILLER
Snowboarding slopestyle by Connie Colwell Miller JUV 796.939 MILLER
The golden age of pirates : an interactive history adventure by Bob Temple JUV 910.45 TEMPLE
The Titanic : an interactive history adventure by Bob Temple JUV 910.91634 TEMPLE
The American presidency by Christine Peterson JUV 973.099 PETERSON
The Battle of Bunker Hill : an interactive history adventure by Michael Burgan JUV 973.3312 BURGAN
The Underground Railroad : an interactive history adventure by Allison Lassieur JUV 973.7115 LASSIEUR
The California Gold Rush : an interactive history adventure by Elizabeth Raum JUV 979.404 RAUM
Face the music by Beth Beechwood JUV FIC BEECHWOOD
Soccer hero by Stephanie True Peters JUV FIC CHRISTOPHER
Seeing green by M. C. King JUV FIC KING
Don't bet on it by Ann Lloyd JUV FIC LLOYD
Nightmare on Hannah Street by Laurie McElroy JUV FIC MCELROY
Dunk under pressure by Rich Wallace JUV FIC WALLACE
Takedown by Rich Wallace JUV FIC WALLACE
A remarkable mother by Jimmy Carter LP BIO CARTER CARTER
Vineyard chill : a Martha's Vineyard mystery by Philip R. Craig MYS FIC CRAIG
The price of blood : an Irish novel of suspense by Declan Hughes MYS FIC HUGHES
Dalton Philadelphia metro business directory : Philadelphia/Suburbs/South Jersey/Delaware. REF 338.9748 DALTON AT DESK
Poet's market. REF 808 WRITERS DIGEST
Resolution by Robert B. Parker WES FIC PARKER

2 Comments:

Blogger Mike Vandeman said...

Last Child in the Woods ––
Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder,
by Richard Louv
Michael J. Vandeman, Ph.D.
November 16, 2006

In this eloquent and comprehensive work, Louv makes a convincing case for ensuring that children (and adults) maintain access to pristine natural areas, and even, when those are not available, any bit of nature that we can preserve, such as vacant lots. I agree with him 100%. Just as we never really outgrow our need for our parents (and grandparents, brothers, sisters, uncles, aunts, cousins, etc.), humanity has never outgrown, and can never outgrow, our need for the companionship and mutual benefits of other species.

But what strikes me most about this book is how Louv is able, in spite of 310 pages of text, to completely ignore the two most obvious problems with his thesis: (1) We want and need to have contact with other species, but neither we nor Louv bother to ask whether they want to have contact with us! In fact, most species of wildlife obviously do not like having humans around, and can thrive only if we leave them alone! Or they are able tolerate our presence, but only within certain limits. (2) We and Louv never ask what type of contact is appropriate! He includes fishing, hunting, building "forts", farming, ranching, and all other manner of recreation. Clearly, not all contact with nature leads to someone becoming an advocate and protector of wildlife. While one kid may see a beautiful area and decide to protect it, what's to stop another from seeing it and thinking of it as a great place to build a house or create a ski resort? Developers and industrialists must come from somewhere, and they no doubt played in the woods with the future environmentalists!

It is obvious, and not a particularly new idea, that we must experience wilderness in order to appreciate it. But it is equally true, though ("conveniently") never mentioned, that we need to stay out of nature, if the wildlife that live there are to survive. I discuss this issue thoroughly in the essay, "Wildlife Need Habitat Off-Limits to Humans!", at http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande/india3.

It should also be obvious (but apparently isn't) that how we interact with nature determines how we think about it and how we learn to treat it. Remember, children don't learn so much what we tell them, but they learn very well what they see us do. Fishing, building "forts", mountain biking, and even berry-picking teach us that nature exists for us to exploit. Luckily, my fort-building career was cut short by a bee-sting! As I was about to cut down a tree to lay a third layer of logs on my little log cabin in the woods, I took one swing at the trunk with my axe, and immediately got a painful sting (there must have been a bee-hive in the tree) and ran away as fast as I could.

On page 144 Louv quotes Rasheed Salahuddin: "Nature has been taken over by thugs who care absolutely nothing about it. We need to take nature back." Then he titles his next chapter "Where Will Future Stewards of Nature Come From?" Where indeed? While fishing may bring one into contact with natural beauty, that message can be eclipsed by the more salient one that the fish exist to pleasure and feed humans (even if we release them after we catch them). (My fishing career was also short-lived, perhaps because I spent most of the time either waiting for fish that never came, or untangling fishing line.) Mountain bikers claim that they are "nature-lovers" and are "just hikers on wheels". But if you watch one of their helmet-camera videos, it is easy to see that 99.44% of their attention must be devoted to controlling their bike, or they will crash. Children initiated into mountain biking may learn to identify a plant or two, but by far the strongest message they will receive is that the rough treatment of nature is acceptable. It's not!

On page 184 Louv recommends that kids carry cell phones. First of all, cell phones transmit on essentially the same frequency as a microwave oven, and are therefore hazardous to one's health –- especially for children, whose skulls are still relatively thin. Second, there is nothing that will spoil one's experience of nature faster than something that reminds one of the city and the "civilized" world. The last thing one wants while enjoying nature is to be reminded of the world outside. Nothing will ruin a hike or a picnic faster than hearing a radio or the ring of a cell phone, or seeing a headset, cell phone, or mountain bike. I've been enjoying nature for over 60 years, and can't remember a single time when I felt a need for any of these items.

It's clear that we humans need to reduce our impacts on wildlife, if they, and hence we, are to survive. But it is repugnant and arguably inhumane to restrict human access to nature. Therefore, we need to practice minimal-impact recreation (i.e., hiking only), and leave our technology (if we need it at all!) at home. In other words, we need to decrease the quantity of contact with nature, and increase the quality.

References:

Ehrlich, Paul R. and Ehrlich, Anne H., Extinction: The Causes and Consequences of the Disappearances of Species. New York: Random House, 1981.

Errington, Paul L., A Question of Values. Ames, Iowa: Iowa State University Press, 1987.

Flannery, Tim, The Eternal Frontier -- An Ecological History of North America and Its Peoples. New York: Grove Press, 2001.

Foreman, Dave, Confessions of an Eco-Warrior. New York: Harmony Books, 1991.

Knight, Richard L. and Kevin J. Gutzwiller, eds. Wildlife and Recreationists. Covelo, California: Island Press, 1995.

Noss, Reed F. and Allen Y. Cooperrider, Saving Nature's Legacy: Protecting and Restoring Biodiversity. Island Press, Covelo, California, 1994.

Stone, Christopher D., Should Trees Have Standing? Toward Legal Rights for Natural Objects. Los Altos, California: William Kaufmann, Inc., 1973.

Vandeman, Michael J., http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande, especially http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande/ecocity3, http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande/india3, http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande/sc8, and http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande/goodall.

Ward, Peter Douglas, The End of Evolution: On Mass Extinctions and the Preservation of Biodiversity. New York: Bantam Books, 1994.

"The Wildlands Project", Wild Earth. Richmond, Vermont: The Cenozoic Society, 1994.

Wilson, Edward O., The Future of Life. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2002.

Abstract:

It is anthropocentric thinking, and irresponsible, to promote the invasion of wildlife habitat without considering: (1) We want and need to have contact with other species, but neither we nor Louv bother to ask whether they want to have contact with us! In fact, most species of wildlife obviously do not like having humans around, and can thrive only if we leave them alone! Or they are able tolerate our presence, but only within certain limits. (2) We and Louv never ask what type of contact is appropriate! He includes fishing, hunting, building "forts", farming, ranching, and all other manner of recreation. Clearly, not all contact with nature leads to someone becoming an advocate and protector of wildlife. While one kid may see a beautiful area and decide to protect it, what's to stop another from seeing it and thinking of it as a great place to build a house or create a ski resort? Developers and industrialists must come from somewhere, and they no doubt played in the woods with the future environmentalists!

2:33 PM  
Blogger Toby said...

I met Dr. Amen at a lecture he gave and then participated in his brain study of injured and uninjured brains. I learned a lot about the damage that can occur even from normal children's bangs to the head - the kind that happen to most kids who engage in sports.

If you are interested in the brain and how it works, I highly recommend reading ""My Stroke of Insight"" by Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor. It's on the NY Times Bestseller list and it's a wonderful book. Dr. Taylor's talk at TED dot com is also AMAZING! Oprah interviewed Dr. Taylor and you can check that out on Oprah.com. And Time Magazine named Dr. T one of the 100 Most Influential people in the world. Having read her book, I can see why all the attention.

Dr. Amen's book is brain science and it's great at that. Dr. Taylor is a Harvard Brain Scientist, but what she writes about is the science and much more. She really cracks the code to understand how our brains (right and left hemispheres) work and she explains how we can get into our right brain and be happier and more joyful. Aside from any of the science, My Stroke of Insight is also just a great story.

7:37 PM  

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